© Ella Ling

Stars and Stripes

Diary: Where would doubles be without the Bryans?

   

Bob Bryan is a generous man. One half of the most successful doubles pair in the Open Era, after he and twin brother Mike won the men’s doubles at the US Open for grand slam title number 12 on Friday, Bob was happily passing his gold medal around the interview room at Flushing Meadows, spreading the love, and it seems, the luck. Bob, who has been carrying around the medal with him everywhere since their Olympic triumph earlier this month, said many people who had come into contact with it since had had an upswing in their fortunes.

“I let Sergio Garcia wear it in Cincinnati and he went win and third and won $1.5 million,” Bob said. “So I think it brings good luck.” Bob then threw it to one of the assembled media, with the instruction to pass it round. “But it’s going home tomorrow,” he said. Bob also tried to put his young daughter Miceala Bryan into the US Open doubles trophy, to no avail.

Just a word on the Bryans. They have blazed the trail, at times alone, for doubles for more than a decade and done so always with a smile on their face, in great spirit. Their skill and longevity on the court is unrivalled and their Open Era record title haul of 12 grand slams is absolutely fantastic and well deserved. Doubles might not be in the strong state that it is today without them and they deserve every success that comes to them. Unfortunately for their rivals, they intend to carry on until the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, so they are almost certain to extend that record and perhaps put it out of reach.

Uniqlo, the Japanese clothing company Novak Djokovic switched to from the once-great now fading Sergio Tacchini brand, appear to be learning fast. While it failed to get the Djokovic range of clothing in its London stores in time for Wimbledon (admittedly it was only a month after they announced the partnership), it did not make the same mistake in New York, where the Novak range is front and centre in its Fifth Avenue store.

The timing could be perfect if Djokovic goes on to successfully defend his US Open title and even if he doesn’t, enough people have been through the store already, no doubt, to make it a far more profitable enterprise than anything Sergio Tacchini, with all its US distribution problems, managed.